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... supports Professor William Snyder's sections of National Security Law, Counterterrorism Law, and Prosecuting Terrorists at the Syracuse University College of Law.

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Archive for the ‘Military tribunals’ Category

SCOTUS Blog: “Congress’s War Crimes Power at Issue”

A post on SCOTUS Blog by Lyle Denniston reports that, on Tuesday, the D.C. Circuit Court voted to review congressional authority to apply war crime laws to terrorist acts that took place prior to the enactment of the laws making such acts criminal. The decision to review arises directly from the case against Ali Hamza […]

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Is the White House lying about Tsarnaev?

I have been asked this question a lot by students: Professor: I have a question regarding the charges and trial of the Boston bomber. I took your Prosecuting Terrorists course two years ago, and I vividly recall the semester long debate over how and where to try suspected terrorists. It was my understanding that we […]

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Actual Charging Document for Tsarnaev in Federal District Court

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston bombings, has been charged with using weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) and malicious destruction of property resulting in death. The Washington Post reports that the defendant will not be tried as an “enemy combatant” but as a civilian.   The choice to prosecute Tsarnaev as a civilian is significant […]

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U.S. Army Spec. Millay Sentenced on Espionage Charges

The Washington Post reports U.S. Army policeman William Colton Millay was sentenced by a panel of 8 military officials on Tuesday to sixteen years in prison and dishonorable discharge for attempting to sell secrets to someone he believed was a Russian spy. Millay’s arrest came after he was caught trading an envelope of information for […]

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USS Cole Conspiracy Trial at Gitmo Postponed Due to Apparent Security Breach

The Miami Herald reports that Gitmo chief judge Army Col. James L. Pohl ordered a two-month delay in pre-trial proceedings in the USS Cole conspiracy case “in the interest of justice” following reports that portions of the Pentagon computer system housing defense and prosecution court documents is not secure. After certain defense documents disappeared from […]

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Judge Rules: Participant in Bin Laden Raid May Testify in Case Against Manning

According to an article by The Washington Post, Army Col. Denise Lind ruled yesterday that a member of the team that raided Osama bin Laden’s compound may testify for the prosecution in the case against former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning. Manning is awaiting a court martial for his role in the WikiLeaks security breach whereby […]

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Foreign Policy Contributors Favor a Less Military-Centric Approach to U.S. Counterterrorism Efforts

Phillip Carter and Deborah Pearlstein recently published an article in Foreign Policy arguing, “[W]e’ve already figured out how to win the legal war on terrorism.” And how, exactly, is that? According to Carter and Pearlstein, the United States should use military force only when “necessary and appropriate,” and, in most instances, should instead rely on […]

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Warsame’s Case Provides a “Template” for How U.S. Will Proceed Against Alleged Terrorists Captured Overseas

The manner in which to proceed with the prosecution of Ahmed Abdul Kadir Warsame, a top facilitator between al-Qaeda franchises who was captured while on a boat in the Gulf of Aden sailing between Somalia and Yemen, sparked controversy between politicians and intelligence officials, according to The Washington Post. Generally, The Post reports that the Obama […]

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U.S. Army Seeks Death Penalty in Case Against Sgt. Bales

The New York Times reports that the U.S. Army plans to seek the death penalty in its case against Staff Sergeant Robert Bales, who is charged with 16 counts of premeditated murder, six counts of attempted murder, and seven counts of assault. Sgt. Bales, The Times further states, allegedly shot and stabbed several individuals, including […]

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Government Study Shows Viability of Closing Guantánamo

The Associated Press reports that a Government Accountability Office study supports closing the prison at Guantánamo Bay. Senator Diane Feinstein, the Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman who released the reports, states that it “demonstrates that if the political will exists, we could finally close Guantánamo without imperiling our national security.” Specifically, the study illustrates that 373 […]

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